This beautiful residence hall will now be Honors College Hall, where all Honors students have the opportunity to live in a dynamic, collaborative, supportive environment. This cutting-edge living-learning community will help recruit top students, enhance group work and mentoring, foster creativity, and enable exciting new pedagogies.

Locating student support services in the same place is nationally recognized as a major advantage in fostering student success. Our plan would create service offices on the ground level, encouraging students to benefit from personal advising, career counseling, and other crucial options.

State funds cannot build this for us. Only you can.


Target:

$600,000 raised toward goal of $1.25 million

48%

A symbol of change at FIU

As more students live on campus, FIU’s former image as a commuter school will be increasingly replaced by a vibrant picture of the major research university it is today, enhancing the value of an FIU degree and of our South Florida community.

Benefits:

  • Unique and close-knit community
  • One-stop student services
  • Gathering space for Honors events
  • Proximity to advisors and faculty
  • Innovative new programs and pedagogies
  • Integrated study spaces and labs
  • Faster graduation rates
  • More engagement opportunities
  • Increased pride and prestige for students
  • Enhanced alumni affinity
  • A fully developed Honors program includes “suitable, preferably prominent, quarters on campus that provide both access for the students and a focal point for Honors activity. Those accommodations include space for Honors administrative, faculty, and support staff functions as appropriate.”
    The National Collegiate Honors Council, the international professional organization for Honors colleges and programs.
  • The new integrated Honors building “is an effort to bolster the university’s academic standing and national reputation. [It] raises the level of the university. . . it will be a visible sign that the university is investing in undergraduate excellence.” Priscilla Clarkson, dean of the Honors College at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • The stress on “the firepower that comes from putting smart, motivated students together,” the value of “one space on campus where deep thought flourishes, and where ‘excellence’ still possesses meaning,” and need for a place that fosters “creativity, conversation, intellectualism, collegiality” are all key reasons why I feel it is vital to put our students, faculty, staff, and support systems in a common home.Nancy M. West, Director, University of Missouri Honors College