Honors College Learning Outcomes

Research Skill

Honors College students will be able to demonstrate the advanced undergraduate research skills necessary in order to succeed in graduate or professional school and/or the workforce.

SLO* (a):  Student can use the principles of conducting academic research.

SLO (b):  Student will be able to conduct logical analysis and synthesis.

SLO (c):  Student will be able to communicate results fluently orally and in writing.

Artifacts that might satisfactorily satisfy these SLOs include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • A research project developed through the Honors College undergraduate research program (formerly known as SRAI) and presented at the annual Honors College Research Conference.
  • A substantial interdisciplinary research project in an Honors College seminar presented at the national (NCHC, NCUR), regional, or state level, or at an approved professional conference .
  • A substantial research paper written for an Honors College seminar.
  • An Honors thesis in the major.

Method of Documentation

The student’s primary method of documenting these research accomplishments will be to submit the paper or project, then comment on it in the reflection.  The student should consider such questions as the following:

  • Why and how did you get involved in the research activity?
  • What did you learn from it?
  • Where do you stand now as a researcher?
  • In what areas do you need to improve your research skills?
  • How important is research to your personal goals?
  • In what ways do you project these skills will be useful to you in the future?

Interdisciplinarity and Connectivity

Honors College students will be able to recognize and apply multiple disciplinary approaches to analyzing and solving a problem.

SLO (a) Student can demonstrate the application of ideas, methods, and knowledge from multiple disciplines to a question or issue.

SLO (b) Student can recognize connections among things learned inside and outside the classroom.

The student’s portfolio artifact(s) should demonstrate a multi- disciplinary approach to analyzing and potentially solving a problem.  That is, in analyzing an issue, event, or work of art, the student should be able to bring into the analysis insights from such fields as psychology, history, religious studies, the law, ethics, and so on.

Artifacts that might satisfactorily satisfy these SLOs include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • A seminar-generated multi-, trans-, or interdisciplinary paper.
  • A multi-disciplinary undergraduate research project.
  • A team project incorporating several approaches, as long as the specific contribution of the student to the project is clearly identified.

Method of Documentation

The student’s primary method of documenting these accomplishments will be to submit the artifact and comment on it in the reflection.  The student should consider such questions as the following:

  • What are the benefits of the interdisciplinary method?
  • What did you learn about and from this method?
  • How will using multiple disciplines in looking at problem-solving benefit you in graduate school and/or your career?
  • How can you overcome the disparity in the methods and approaches of individual disciplines?

Global Learning

Honors College students will understand and be able to discuss international issues and cultures from around the world.

SLO (a):  Global Awareness: Student can demonstrate knowledge of interrelatedness of local, global, international, and intercultural issues, trends, and systems.

SLO (b):  Global Perspective:  Student is able to develop a multi-perspective analysis of local, global, international, and intercultural problems.

SLO (c):  Global Engagement: Student will demonstrate a willingness to engage in local, global, international, and intercultural problem solving.

The portfolio artifact(s) should demonstrate that the student has learned something substantial about one or more cultures other than his/her own, and that the student appreciates the complex issues involved in negotiating relationships among cultures and in dealing with timely issues.  The Honors College provides students with opportunities to broaden their global educational experience through classroom-based activities; attendance and/or participation in lectures, colloquia, meetings  and conferences on international topics; exposure to the art and culture of other peoples; and travel abroad to engage in activities such as service/research, philanthropy, semesters-abroad, student exchange and traditional study abroad programs. Artifacts that might satisfactorily satisfy these SLOs include, but are not limited to, the following:

An individual paper or project on international issues or on world cultures

  • A group project on a global issue or culture other than the student’s own, as long as the specific contribution of the student to the project is clearly identified.
  • Written reflection on at least three lectures, colloquia, meetings, performances, or conferences on world issues and cultures.
  • Written reflection on traveling overseas to engage in research, service or philanthropy in an Honors College course or program.

Method of Documentation

The primary method of documenting these accomplishments will be to provide an artifact and comment on it in the reflection.  The student should consider such questions as the following:

  • How and why did you select this artifact and its associated activity?
  • How has the activity enhanced your appreciation of international issues and world cultures?
  • How has it affected your educational experience at the Honors College and FIU?
  • What have you learned about yourself through your exposure to other cultures?
  • How has your perception of your role as a global citizen changed through this experience and/or research?

Appreciation of the Creative Arts

Honors College students will be able to analyze and appreciate cultural artifacts.

SLO (a): Students can articulate the importance of cultural artifacts and their production.

SLO (b): Students can demonstrate integrated knowledge and appreciation of the arts in their exploration of important questions and issues.

The portfolio artifact should demonstrate that you are a well-rounded individual, intellectually curious and interested in the world.  The Honors College provides the opportunity to experience, understand and analyze different forms of the visual, musical, literary and movement arts from different periods and traditions. Students are also encouraged to create and perform works of art and to publish literary and critical work.

  • Artifacts that might satisfactorily satisfy these SLOs include, but are not limited to, the following:  A paper, review, essay, critical analysis or other demonstration of artistic cultural appreciation.
  • Written reflections on attendance at least three art exhibits; dramatic, artistic, or musical performances; or readings and/or presentations by published authors.
  • An original work of visual, musical, multimedia, literary, or movement art related to an Honors class.
  • Public performance of a role in a play, a literary or poetry reading, a musical piece, a political speech, or other original  composition.
  • Publication of an original written work.

The primary method of documenting these accomplishments will be to submit the artifact and comment on it in the reflection.  The student should consider such questions and as the following:

  • How and why did you choose to attend or participate in this activity?
  • How have these creative works enhanced your understanding of yourself and your place in the world?
  • Has your estimation of the value of artistic culture changed as a result of the activity?
  • Has the activity enhanced your cultural literacy?
  • Has the activity helped you to express yourself through the creation or the performance of creative work?

Leadership and Community Engagement

Honors College students will demonstrate leadership skills.

SLO (a):  Student can demonstrate an awareness and applications of ethical principles.

SLO (b):  Assume leadership roles in the classroom, organization(s), and/or the larger community.

SLO (c):  Show participation in activities that contribute to the common good.

Honors College students are expected to return the investment made in them by the Honors College and FIU by becoming productive, honorable, service-oriented citizens, community leaders, and achievers.  This kind of leadership can be exercised in a number of places—for example, at the university, in the larger community, nationally, or in a worship center.  The student need not be elected to office to be a legitimate leader—substantial community service, for example, also demonstrates leadership.

Artifacts that might satisfactorily satisfy these SLOs include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • A substantial project completed in the first-year Honors leadership course or Honors seminar.
  • Election to office in an Honors or FIU organization.
  • Evidence of successful or substantial advocacy for a student or public issue.
  • Receiving awards or recognition for service to others.
  • Substantially and productively serving the larger community.
  • Successfully founding a new organization or lasting activity.

Method of Documentation

The primary method of documenting these accomplishments will be to submit evidence of the activities performed and comment on them in the reflection paper.  The student should consider such points as the following:

  • Why and how you did you get involved in the activity?
  • What did you learned from it?
  • In what way do you consider that you exercised a leadership role?
  • Did being in the Honors College enhance your ability to perform well in that role?
  • Where do you stand now as a leader?
  • In what areas do you need to improve your leadership skills?
  • What kinds of things do you see yourself undertaking as a leader in the future?
  • How important is leadership to your self-understanding?

* SLO stands for Student Learning Outcome.  This is the goal that we hope to achieve by your having been exposed to the Honors curriculum.