Observing Ourselves: A Legal Primer for Life After Honors


Details

INSTRUCTOR: H. Scott Fingerhut

SECTION: U05

SCHEDULE: Monday 3:00PM – 5:50PM


Course Description

For starters, this course is for honors students, not merely students enrolled in The Honors College or students conveniently available Mondays at 3. Because this course, grounded in law — legal concepts, legal cases, legal documents, and legal theory — is about finding oneself by losing oneself; about recognizing our mutuality of experience, from the inevitable to the mysterious; about harnessing talent and education; and ultimately, about having something to say. This course is about confronting the demon in the woods and the talent myth; the clock of competition; the cult of clever and personality; and the notions that coming of age happens all in one moment, or that growing up somehow ever stops. This course is about the lion in the psyche; about being present and creative; and about wonder and pioneering in the classroom, matched only by the scratchy roughness of regular life and the beauty in finding balance, embraced by the capacity to doubt and willingness to believe in equal measure. This course is about the excitement of being in the room, and interest in wisdom. It’s about the power of sense and memory, the difficulty of translating want into knowing, and of course, about justice, real justice, and the thrill in the rest of your life. Observing Ourselves is about time. And memories changing. And in the end, Observing Ourselves is about grace, and taking responsibility; how we carry ourselves in the world; an exercise in patience; an observation of life, secret to you, and a pure celebration of self. Not some toxic pose or imitation, but the creative – and oftentimes legal — play and brilliance that come with knowing what is, and a laser-like focus on all the things you want to do and all the people you want to be. This course is a depletion, that does not come for free. But provides you with the strength to say so out loud. And to write about it. What it means to you. The articulate rendered speechless. Everything.

Students will learn to:

  • Not suddenly become very conscious of the lateness of things.